Book of the Week


Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South
by Jaime Amanda Martinez

"Martinez challenges the standard critiques of slave impressment with fresh and substantial evidence. An original contribution to Civil War scholarship."
--George Rable
~~~

Elizabeth D. Leonard co-winner of 2012 Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize

Lincoln's Forgotten Ally: Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt of Kentucky, by Elizabeth D. LeonardWe are delighted to share the great news that Lincoln’s Forgotten Ally: Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt of Kentucky, by Elizabeth D. Leonard, has been named co-winner of the 2012 Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize, awarded by Gettysburg College and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

The prize, which includes an award of $50,000, will be shared by Leonard and William C. Harris, author of Lincoln and the Border States: Preserving the Union (University Press of Kansas).

The prize committee says:

“This year’s winners — William Harris’s Lincoln and the Border States and Elizabeth Leonard’s Lincoln’s Forgotten Ally — both tell important stories in wonderfully readable prose, while deepening our understanding of Lincoln and the Civil War era,” said Gilder Lehrman Institute President James G. Basker. “These are both ‘must reads’ for anyone who cares about the complex political challenges Lincoln and his government faced during the worst crisis in our country’s history.”

 

The Won Cause: Black and White Comradeship in the Grand Army of the Republic, by Barbara A. GannonAnd that’s not all! We are also happy to report that Barbara A. Gannon has been awarded an honorable mention by the prize committee for her book The Won Cause: Black and White Comradeship in the Grand Army of the Republic.

The committee says of The Won Cause:

Gannon’s book examines how black Union veterans crafted their own narrative of the Civil War, and how they reinforced this narrative with one another at their post-war Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) meetings. Gannon examines not only the activities of black GAR chapters, but also notes the rather startling fact that there were a number of racially integrated chapters. She demonstrates how shared suffering and sentimentalism counteracted racism, to a degree, among veterans in what was a profoundly racist era.

We congratulate these fine scholars on their achievements and thank them for the important contributions their work has made to Civil War history.

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